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Recent Citations

Atomic structure of Hsp90-Cdc37-Cdk4 reveals that Hsp90 traps and stabilizes an unfolded kinase. Verba KA, Wang RY et al. Science. 2016 Jun 24;352(6293):1542-7.

Diverse roles of assembly factors revealed by structures of late nuclear pre-60S ribosomes. Wu S, Tutuncuoglu B et al. Nature. 2016 Jun 2;534(7605):133-7.

Using cryo-EM to map small ligands on dynamic metabolic enzymes: studies with glutamate dehydrogenase. Borgnia MJ, Banerjee S et al. Mol Pharmacol. 2016 Jun;89(6):645-51.

Structure of the intact ATM/Tel1 kinase. Wang X, Chu H et al. Nat Commun. 2016 May 27;7:11655.

Near-atomic resolution visualization of human transcription promoter opening. He Y, Yan C et al. Nature. 2016 May 19;533(7603):359-65.

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News

June 23, 2016

PLOS Computational Biology announces winning T-shirt design created by Luigi Di Costanzo (RCSB Protein Data Bank) using UCSF Chimera.

April 6, 2016

A production release candidate (v1.11) is available; please try it and report any problems. 64-bit builds are now recommended for all capable platforms, and v1.11 will be the last to support 32-bit builds. See the release notes for what's new.

July 23, 2015

Chimera production release 1.10.2 is now available. Fixes include code signing for Mac OS X installation. The 1.10 series will be the last to support OS X 10.6 and 10.7. See the release notes for details.

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Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a highly extensible program for interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, supramolecular assemblies, sequence alignments, docking results, trajectories, and conformational ensembles. High-quality images and animations can be generated. Chimera includes complete documentation and several tutorials, and can be downloaded free of charge for academic, government, non-profit, and personal use. Chimera is developed by the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI), funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIGMS P41-GM103311).

UCSF ChimeraX (or simply ChimeraX) is the next-generation molecular visualization program from the RBVI, following UCSF Chimera. It is in early development and not yet publicly released, with release anticipated sometime in 2016.

Feature Highlight

2mnr metal site
2mnr metal site

Metal Geometry

The Metal Geometry tool facilitates analysis of metal-binding sites. It lists potential metal-coordinating atoms (nearby nucleophilic heteroatoms) and suggests likely coordination geometries. An idealized geometry can be depicted with solid arrows, as shown in the figure for the octahedral coordination of Mn++ by six atoms, and the coordination pseudobonds in the structure can be updated to match the chosen geometry.

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Gallery Sample

Clathrin

This image of a clathrin cage uses flat shading and edge highlighting. It is a copy of a PDB molecule of the month image made by Graham Johnson and Dave Goodsell. David Goodsell pioneered this visualization style. This image was made with the Multiscale tool, silhouette edging, and surface lighting turned off.

Protein Data Bank model 1xi4.

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