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Recent Citations

Structure and dynamics of the active human parathyroid hormone receptor-1. Zhao LH, Ma S et al. Science. 2019 Apr 12;364(6436):148-153.

Ligand-triggered allosteric ADP release primes a plant NLR complex. Wang J, Wang J et al. Science. 2019 Apr 5;364(6435). pii: eaav5868.

The phage L capsid decoration protein has a novel OB-fold and an unusual capsid binding strategy. Newcomer RL, Schrad JR et al. eLife. 2019 Apr 4;8. pii: e45345.

De novo structural pattern mining in cellular electron cryotomograms. Xu M, Singla J et al. Structure. 2019 Apr 2;27(4):679-691.e14.

Coupling of ssRNA cleavage with DNase activity in type III-A CRISPR-Csm revealed by cryo-EM and biochemistry. Guo M, Zhang K et al. Cell Res. 2019 Apr;29(4):305-312.

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November 17, 2018

Chimera production release 1.13.1 is now available; see the release notes for what's new. The Mac version requires OS 10.10 or later.

October 22, 2018

Mac users: the 1.13.1 release candidate and recent daily builds contain a fix for Mojave (OS 10.14). These versions require OS 10.10 or later.

September 21, 2018

Mac users are advised to hold off upgrading to Mojave until we find a fix for Chimera buttons not being shown until the windows containing them are resized.

(Previous news...)

Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a highly extensible program for interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, supramolecular assemblies, sequence alignments, docking results, trajectories, and conformational ensembles. High-quality images and animations can be generated. Chimera includes complete documentation and several tutorials, and can be downloaded free of charge for academic, government, nonprofit, and personal use. Chimera is developed by the Resource for Biocomputing, Visualization, and Informatics (RBVI), supported in part by the National Institutes of Health (P41-GM103311).

UCSF ChimeraX (or simply ChimeraX) is the next-generation molecular visualization program from the RBVI, following UCSF Chimera.

Feature Highlight

EM map morph

Morphing Density Maps

Related density maps can be compared by morphing from one to the other. Several intermediate maps are generated by interpolating between the starting and ending maps. The morph can be viewed interactively and recorded as a movie. The contour level can be adjusted automatically to keep the enclosed volume constant throughout the morph, and other aspects of map display can be adjusted with Volume Viewer.

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Gallery Sample

Cavity and Tunnel Detection

Side-by-side views of a potassium channel structure (Protein Data Bank entry 1bl8) showing different approaches to cavity detection. On the left are molecular surface patches corresponding to the structure's two largest pockets by MS volume in the Computed Atlas of Surface Topography of proteins (CASTp) database. On the right is a tunnel in blue identified by the MolAxis server. Simple editing converted MolAxis output into a BILD file for display in Chimera. (More samples...)


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