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DPP9 sequesters the C terminus of NLRP1 to repress inflammasome activation. Hollingsworth LR, Sharif H et al. Nature. 2021 Apr 29;592(7856):778-783.

Structural basis of malaria RIFIN binding by LILRB1-containing antibodies. Chen Y, Xu K et al. Nature. 2021 Apr 22;592(7855):639-643.

CryoET structures of immature HIV Gag reveal six-helix bundle. Mendonça L, Sun D et al. Commun Biol. 2021 Apr 16;4(1):481.

Structure and dynamics of the CGRP receptor in apo and peptide-bound forms. Josephs TM, Belousoff MJ et al. Science. 2021 Apr 9;372(6538):eabf7258.

Structure of TFIIK for phosphorylation of CTD of RNA polymerase II. van Eeuwen T, Li T et al. Sci Adv. 2021 Apr 7;7(15):eabd4420.

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News

May 6, 2021

We're looking for somebody to join the ChimeraX development team! Please see the job posting for details.

December 18, 2020

Chimera production release 1.15 is now available. See the release notes for what's new.

December 11, 2020

The RBVI wishes you a safe and happy holiday season! See our 2020 card and the gallery of previous cards back to 1985.

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Upcoming Events

UCSF Chimera is a program for the interactive visualization and analysis of molecular structures and related data, including density maps, trajectories, and sequence alignments. It is available free of charge for noncommercial use. Commercial users, please see Chimera commercial licensing.

We encourage Chimera users to try ChimeraX for much better performance with large structures, as well as other major advantages and completely new features. ChimeraX includes a significant subset of Chimera features (with more to come, see the missing features list) and is under active development. Users may choose to use both programs, and it is fine to have both installed.

Chimera is no longer under active development, and is only updated for critical maintenance. Chimera development was supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (P41-GM103311) that ended in 2018.

Feature Highlight

User-Driven Analysis

User-Driven Analysis

Users can easily import structure-related data into Chimera in the form of attributes, or values associated with atoms, residues, or models. The data can be imported with Define Attribute and then represented visually with color ranges, atomic radii, or "worm" thickness. Such data can also be manipulated programmatically in Chimera, and in fact Chimera was designed with extensibility and programmability in mind. It is largely implemented in Python, with certain features coded in C++ for efficiency. Python is an easy-to-learn interpreted language with object-oriented features. All of Chimera's functionality is accessible through Python and users can implement their own algorithms and extensions without any Chimera code changes, so any such custom extensions will continue to work across Chimera releases. Many programming examples are provided to assist extension writers.

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Gallery Sample

RNA Bases

Large ribosomal RNA is shown with individual bases depicted using solvent excluded molecular surfaces. Bases A, C, G, U are colored red, yellow, green, and blue. The surfaces were made with the Chimera multiscale tool in combination with the nucleic acid blobs plug-in. The image was raytraced using POVray.

Protein Data Bank model 1s72.

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